All for one and one for all?

Platforms and channels can be a great tools for promotion, but can all of these tools reach your public? The simple answer is no.

Although generational gaps are closer than ever before, with the dawn of social media and emphasis on online presence dominating media channels, it would be naive to say that Grandma Mavis and little Tommy are reached by the same channels. Clay Shirky would argue that there is no such things as Generation X (the Post WW2 generation not the Billy Idol band!) and it is only new opportunities that have created these gaps, and I would tend to agree. With any new technology there are different stages of adoption, Rogers Bell Curve demonstrates the different stages of adoption from Early Adopters to Laggards and it still accurately identifies how people respond to new technology. In time though people catch up with new technology and they become valuable tools, take television for example. Before TV’s became common place in people’s living rooms, radio’s were the main source of information and entertainment. Slowly but surely televisions caught on and now, 97% of households in the UK have a television (TV Licensing).

You may be thinking, what does this have to do with PR? Well in order to reach your audience effectively you need to know what channels and platforms they are using. Creating a Facebook group to promote your local women’s Institute isn’t going to be as effective as creating a Facebook group to launch a new Night Club in town. Now I’m not saying that nobody over the age of 40 uses Facebook in fact the largest users of Facebook are 40-45 year olds, I’m saying that organisations need to look a platforms and channels and judge whether it is an effective tool for their public.

I mentioned in an earlier post that organisations need to understand the channels (e.g. Facebook) before they start using them. Facebook can be a powerful tool, but only if it is used in the right way. This is true of all types of media old and new, before an organisation goes bull at a gate trying to adopt every new channel invented, they need to take the time to analyse the tool and evaluate whether it is the right channel to use to reach their public. Getting it wrong can be hugely detrimental to a company, in 2009 HabitatUK used it’s Twitter account to promote a promotion they were running. Nothing wrong with this, but in order to promote it they #hashtagged trending topics that bore no relevance to the company and effectively spammed the site. This went down very badly with Twitter users and the company was forced to apologise but this faux par black listed the company’s social media standing.

There are hundreds of different forms of media platforms and channels today and there really is a tool that can be used to reach every type of public. Traditional forms of media including newspapers, radio and television are still valuable, especially when reaching an older audience. Equally online media like Wiki’s, blogs and websites are great to reach middle aged publics and social media like Facebook is great for younger audiences (17-35 year olds). Of course these are sweeping generalisations and more in depth research is easily found especially for online tools (Ignite Media has some particular thorough research).

What PR agencies and CEO’s need to take from this is that just because there’s a new media channel it doesn’t mean that you should adopt it. You need to ensure that it is the right tool to target your audience and if it isn’t going to be beneficial then don’t use it. If you were launching a new night club you wouldn’t place an advert in Saga Magazine (unless it’s a night club for the over 60’s!) and it’s no different with any other media channel if it’s not going to reach your public it’s not worth investing in. It is easy in this digital age to forget traditional media like newspaper and radio but this could be a huge mistake. Essentially an organisation needs to understand it’s customers and what types of media they use, once they have this basic understanding then they can look into the most effective media channels to adopt in order to reach them.

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2 thoughts on “All for one and one for all?

  1. I hate the term “sell out” because everyone has to make money somehow. But let’s face it, most marketing and advertisement campaigns are basically evil. They entice you with delicious burgers that are terrible for your health, or expensive clothing that will tear in a month.
    But in order to operate a functional business these days, having publicity is key. Having knowledge of public relations is also key for anyone looking to excel in any form of media art, or information field. Publicizing yourself is key. I find this stuff interesting. I would love to make my blog more available to the general public, only to gain more experience in these subjects and to share my thoughts with others.

    • I think the term ‘sell out’ is becoming as useless a term as ‘living legend’! Lets be honest companies need to promote and advertise their products and that’s fine in fact it’s great, we all love it when a funny, clever or creative advert or stunt appears. I just have an issue with companies thinking they need to have a Facebook page because everyone else has one regardless of whether it will be truly beneficial to them. I would strongly encourage companies to promote and publicise themselves but for our sakes and their own they need make sure they’re doing it effectively!

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