Tracking…not always used for bears and parcels

Organisations seem to be getting obsessed with how many Twitter followers they have or how many people like them on Facebook, what they are failing to notice is whether these people are even interacting with their brand?

I noticed the other day, at the top of a local high end lifestyle magazine that they printed how many Twitter followers they have and how many likes they have on Facebook and it got me thinking. Why do companies get sucked into this false pretense that if 1 million people are following them on Twitter it means that these 1 million people are also buying their product? I’m sure there is a percentage of these people and in some case it could be as high as 90% that actually interact and purchase from an organisation they ‘like’ on Facebook, but in most cases the overwhelming majority don’t.

We are all guilty ourselves of seeing a brand’s Facebook page that we like, or we like to be seen to like and hitting the ‘like’ button (I am genuinely sorry for the amount of times I used the word ‘like’ in that sentence). But the likelihood of you ever returning to that page is pretty low. Organisations don’t seem to be using their personal experience of social media and transferring it into their professional usage. Maybe this is highlighting a need for younger members of the organisation to be taking a lead on social media communications or maybe it is showing how quick organisations are to take up social media but how slow they are to actually understand the inner social workings of them.

Instead of the ‘local high end lifestyle magazine’ stating how many people ‘like’ them on Facebook why don’t they print how many unique page views they get a month or how many returning visits they get? Both of these statistics would say far more about them than their Facebook likes do. What I’m trying to get at is there are ways for organisations to track customer interaction with their website and social media that are far more valuable than the amount of followers they have on Twitter.

Trackers (not the types used for bears or parcels!) can range from free programs like StatCounter that do basic monitoring including how many unique views, return visits and page loads your site receives. StatCounter then complies these into a weekly report and email them straight to you. The best thing about StatCounter is that it’s easy to install by simply pasting an html code onto your blog or website. As well as free services you can also find plenty of paid for tracking programs ranging in prices and the amount of monitoring they do. Trackur is a popular program offering services from influencer analysis, allowing you to find out who is talking about your product the most to an archive of every conversation had about your brand online. Depending on what exactly you want tracking will determine whether you really need to spend a lot of money on a program like Trackur or whether using a free service like StatCounter will be enough for you.

Although saying you have 1 million followers on Twitter and 2 million likes on Facebook might be impressive figures, being able to tell how many of these people are frequent visitors or influential bloggers is actually more useful for an organisation. This is another example of organisations taking up social media to follow a trend, without really knowing how the tools work and how they can be effectively used. Instead of obsessing over how may likes you have I urge organisations to look closer at traffic statistics to see whether their social media presence is really working for them.

Advertisements